ISIS Founder and Leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is Dead

The ISIS founder and leader is dead, what is next for ISIS.

Illustration+of+Abu+Bakr+al-Baghdadi+by+the+New+York+Times+in+2016
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ISIS Founder and Leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is Dead

Illustration of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi by the New York Times in 2016

Illustration of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi by the New York Times in 2016

Minggu

Illustration of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi by the New York Times in 2016

Minggu

Minggu

Illustration of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi by the New York Times in 2016

Lord Toussaint, Editor in Chief

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On the 27th of October, President Donald Trump declared that the leader and founder of the Islamic state Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, was killed during a US raid on his compound in north western Syria.

“Last night the United States brought the world’s No. 1 terrorist leader to justice. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is dead,” said President Trump. He then revealed numerous details surrounding the death of the terrorist leader, saying, “He (Baghdadi) died after running into a dead-end tunnel, whimpering, crying, and screaming all the way.”

The president continued his very vivid description of the takedown. “He (Baghdadi) had dragged three of his young children with him. They were led to certain death. He reached the end of the tunnel as our dogs chased them down. He ignited his vest, killing himself and the three children. His body was mutilated by the blast, the tunnel had caved in on it in addition.” He then ended the speech by saying, “He died like a dog. He died like a coward. The world is now a much safer place.”

This highly unanticipated move came shortly  after Trump made his decision to withdrawal troops from North Eastern Syria in the light of the Turkish invasion of the area earlier this month. It was what some called a “brilliant” move to perform the raid at the time, as it was not speculated that the US would send in more troops in the midst of a withdrawal. They caught Baghdadi, and the rest of the world, off guard.

As incredible as this operation was for the US and its allies, the Islamic State is still active, despite the multiple setbacks it has faced this year. Which include the defeat of the physical ISIS caliphate in March of 2019 and now the death of Baghdadi. The questions now at hand are how these events will affect the ideology of radical Islam as a whole and how the hundreds of ISIS fighters that escaped imprisonments during the Turkish invasion of Northern Syria will react to these set backs.

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